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Microsoft Fined by EU, and "Punished" Too By HP

Microsoft Fined by EU, and "Punished" Too By HP

  • Read Maureen O'Gara's March 12 Scoop: HP Starts Pushing Desktop Linux

    As previously reported here, HP is determined to be the world's first blue-chip IT vendors to push Linux - as opposed to Windows - on the desktop.

    Reuters is reporting that HP has used the occasion of Novell's BrainShare conference in Salt Lake City this week to announce support for Novell SUSE Linux not just on its larger computer servers but also on HP's desktop and notebook computer lines.

    Asked whether Microsoft likes the dramatic new initiative, Martin Fink, VP of Linux for HP, said:

    "Does Microsoft like the fact that we do Linux stuff? Absolutely not. But they understand that we deliver Linux. We've done some work with Linux in the desktop space before so for me this is a not a really big thing to do with Microsoft."

    According to the Reuters report, Fink explained that HP expects businesses to use Linux mostly where employees only need a few applications, such as in a call center or support center where workers need to access only a database and e-mail.
  • More Stories By Linux News Desk

    SYS-CON's Linux News Desk gathers stories, analysis, and information from around the Linux world and synthesizes them into an easy to digest format for IT/IS managers and other business decision-makers.

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    Most Recent Comments
    David Jones 05/19/04 08:03:50 AM EDT

    They are far too big for any regulatory entity to "effectively" oversee. That's why they need a punishment
    that will Cialis get their attention and will make them think twice before engaging in corrupt unethical business practices. Not sure this is correct...

    samuel lawson 04/14/04 01:16:36 AM EDT

    They are far too big for any regulatory entity to "effectively" oversee. That's why they need a punishment
    that will Levitra get their attention and will make them think twice
    before engaging in corrupt unethical business practices.

    Jack drews 04/14/04 01:15:04 AM EDT

    "...the only thing that would satisfy some people is for the ENTIRE STAFF of MS and particularly Bill, to be stripped Viagra

    Fecal Extrusion 03/26/04 12:54:02 PM EST

    ANOTHER THING...
    I have YET to see Microsoft EVER pay out "CASH".
    I'm sure they'll spend the good part of the next
    few months or years trying to negotiate the cash
    penalty into vouchers/coupons for computers and
    MS software. (...And throw in some X-boxes - just see
    the MikeRoweSoft fiasco).

    Fecal Extrusion 03/26/04 12:45:33 PM EST

    DevilsAdvocado...
    in response to YOUR comment:
    "...the only thing that would satisfy some people is for the ENTIRE STAFF of MS and particularly Bill, to be stripped of all rights and asessts..."

    No, JUST Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer!

    The employees of Enron and WorldCom were victims, as are
    MS' employees. The decision makers must be punished.

    You cry for the MS employees... What about all the jobs
    lost by employees from companies crushed by MS and its
    actions?

    I would be quite happy with the OS being taken from them,
    open sourced and put into the public domain.

    It's the "WINDOWS" component of Microsoft's operations that
    gives them the monopoly and the advantage when it comes
    to writing applications for it. Take away the bees stinger.

    They are far too big for any regulatory entity to "effectively" oversee. That's why they need a punishment
    that will get their attention and will make them think twice
    before engaging in corrupt unethical business practices.

    Rob 03/25/04 09:27:41 PM EST

    Meh, in all reality, what is it to us? Granted, we're all using Linux here some way or another, I'm guessing, so this wouldn't really affect OUR computing too much. So the ruling says that they have to stop bundeling the media player and the like with the OS. I'm guessing the users will also be able to download them off of MS's website. So what does this really do? It's around 500mil euros that goes to the EC then? I just don't really understand what the ruling is supposed to do. Even on my Windows computers, I use RealPlayer and Quicktime, not Windows Media Player, and websites could just be like the BBC or Apple's Quicktime websites, and say "Hey, if you want to see our stuff, you have to get Real Player/QuickTime". And I really don't see too many websites doing streaming windows media format video, so what does it really do?

    Finally, if MS doesn't bundle WMP in with Windows, I seriously doubt that they're going to bundle QT or RP.

    DevilsAdvocado 03/25/04 04:41:57 PM EST

    Fecal Extrusion
    in respone to "This IS LINNUXWORLD! What were you expecting to read here??"

    hoping to read balanced arguments. I dont think we should be seeking the overnight destruction of MS. Hell, their staff have mortgages to pay like anyone else. The zeal with which some opinions are expressed on this site, you would think that the only thing that would satisfy some people is for the entire staff of MS and particularly Bill, to be stripped of all rights and asessts and placed in dark, damp, rat infested dungeons for the rest of their days - and thats too lenient for some !. It is my opinion that what is needed above all else is for strong control, checks, balances, monitoring and remedies to make MS play fair and keep playing fair. With all their resources, if they really had to compete fairly we might get some real innovation from them, (not something they have "embraced and extended"). Then everyone benefits

    Fecal Extrusion 03/25/04 04:09:14 PM EST

    Ummm... BillieBobGatez,
    In response to your statement:

    "...and the linux ms-hater bandwagon trolls are coming out again!"

    This IS LINNUXWORLD! What were you expecting to read here??

    Fecal Extrusion 03/25/04 04:02:04 PM EST

    Microsoft will not stop until it is the ONLY manufacturer
    of electronics and software in existence in the US.
    And as long as George W Bush (a.k.a. Bill Gates' puppet)
    is in power, the Bush administration will help Microsoft
    make that a reality.

    Just like everyone already KNOWS... The only to make
    MS executives play nice with the rest of the technology
    world, is to "break up" MS. And give Windows to the
    public domain. (So It can be fixed by people with BRAINS!)
    Even the US Justice dept knows that, but has been ORDERED
    by the Bush Admin. to leave them alone.

    Apparently competition is a threat to George W. Bush too.

    DevilsAdvocado 03/25/04 06:26:06 AM EST

    Microsoft have been found to be an abusive monopolist, both in Europe and in America. Evidence is coming to light in the current case in Minnesota about their unfair business practices to crush rivals. Their "embrace and extend" philosophy with regard to competing technologies has been shown to be merely attempts to make those technologies proprietry, etc. etc. In short, based on past conduct there is reason to believe MS will attempt further abusive behaviour. If other products are effectively locked out because MS will make their own version of a product and bundle it with an operating system that you must have to run your PC, what incentive is there for innovation ?.

    The industry has seen the remnants of companies (some of them former partners of MS), that have been driven to extinction by MS.

    MS have played their part in the advancement of the global IT industry, but they have become abusive.
    The reasons why there was such huge acceptance and interopability of PCs WAS to a huge extent because of MS ( respect where it is due)
    The reasons why there is a problem with innovation IS because of MS and the reason why there will be problems in the future WILL be because of MS.

    oneofmany 03/24/04 10:39:25 AM EST

    I agree. The only way to break a monopoly that huge is probably to break it into pieces, say 2-4, with a strong urge to compete. :)

    BillieBobGatez 03/24/04 09:14:10 AM EST

    ...and the linux ms-hater bandwagon trolls are coming out again! In what country does the law impose unlawful punishment? "A cash fine means nothing to MS - Any meaningful punishment has to take the form of limitations imposed upon their business practices itself - above and beyond requiring them to merely comply with law." <-ya, next time you get a speeding ticket, they should cut off your foot, to stop you from using the gas peddle...get real kiddies, they have been found guilty and given a fine fitting the crime (within legal limits), would you prefer we toss out the law books? ...you could be the next victom of your own rules...

    forgetmenot 03/24/04 08:17:06 AM EST

    A cash fine means nothing to MS - Any meaningful punishment has to take the form of limitations imposed upon their business practices itself - above and beyond requiring them to merely comply with law.

    nurb432 03/24/04 08:16:14 AM EST

    Something tells me that the fine was worth it to them, an 'acceptable loss' to hold on to the market.

    LinuxAdvocate 03/24/04 08:15:04 AM EST

    From Reuters on Monday:

    Neil Macehiter, an analyst with London-based technology research firm Ovum, said even a $3 billion fine would have been "an irritant to Microsoft but certainly wouldn't break the bank."

    badasscat 03/24/04 08:13:01 AM EST

    The "slap on the wrist" analogy is often used to show that a penalty is too light, but in fact the whole point of a slap on the wrist is to get your attention and change your way of thinking and acting. Traffic tickets do not usually bankrupt anybody but hopefully they will get you to follow the law. They are an annoyance and one that most people would rather not deal with. And the only real way you eliminate the risk of receiving one is by obeying the law.

    So if this is seen as a traffic ticket, good. The penalty will have done its job.

    Objection 03/24/04 08:12:43 AM EST

    but $613M is just a slap on the wrist for Microsft

    thogard 03/24/04 08:11:44 AM EST

    The only way to stop this nonsense is to break up MSFT into compaines that have to compete with each other but no one has the guts to do that. If Rockefeller was alive to see this he would have been wondering why he couldn't get away with the same thing.

    khasim 03/24/04 08:10:57 AM EST

    This is about smacking MS in the head to get their attention.

    If Microsoft doesn't change its practices, we can see more fines such as this. Eventually, Microsoft will change

    Urrgh? 03/24/04 07:07:06 AM EST

    Wouln't ya know it, Microsoft edged up this morning on early trading. London stock exchange.

    CNN Says 03/24/04 06:40:39 AM EST

    CNN said last week:

    "[Microsoft] is certain to appeal against a Commission decision in the European courts. Litigation could take several years."

    OneQuestion 03/24/04 06:38:22 AM EST

    Will Microsoft just be able to tie this up with endless appeals and draw it out for another five years?

    PHPcomplete 03/24/04 06:37:19 AM EST

    Hopefully this will allow for a more competitive marketplace, where standards are adopted across the board. Open source could really do well because of this. Only a small portion of the world lives in the US, and with the EU nations taking a firm hand in putting down Microsoft.

    For those not sure if this will help the US adoption of alternate products, it will. Businesses aren't just local, they import products, export products, and deal in Europe all the time. When Europeans move to other products, the US will make the move, or force Microsoft to adopt the standards the EU companies do.

    This doesn't spell the end for Microsoft, but rather, it helps to open up a standards based computing environment. One where if your product is closed and completely proprietary, and threatens vendor lock-in, it won't be well appreciated, nor will it really be possible.

    df5jt 03/24/04 06:35:45 AM EST

    > Who thinks this will REALLY change anything?

    It will change the consumers' perception of what Microsoft actually is: an anti-competitive monopolist with questionable business practices

    Agreed!! 03/24/04 06:35:01 AM EST

    Ture. If you harm your competitors though criminal actions you NEED to be punished. Otherwise we're simply saying to everyone that if you want to succeed you need to break the law, and that you won't be punished for doing so. Not if you break really big laws at any rate. Rob a 7-11 and go to jail for life. Steal billions and we'll let you keep your ill-gotten gains.

    I couldn't care less if MS made a complete reversal and was now sponsoring needy children in Africa, they need to be smacked around for their past transgressions that put them where they are today. The fact they haven't stopped just makes it worse.

    amb319 03/24/04 06:34:24 AM EST

    This isn't an anti-MS thing, this is a pro-accountability thing.

    anon 03/24/04 06:32:24 AM EST

    OK so they got fined and told how to distribute windows.

    Who thinks this will REALLY change anything? MS will go a little bit more restricted in how media stuff is installed from a start, but they'll keep on doing the same old crap in every other part of their dealings with the EU

    ManYre 03/24/04 06:31:21 AM EST

    We all know their cash reserves are up in the 40 billion dollar range, but even so it has to hurt