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DevOpsJournal: Article

CollabNet Out to Dominate Cloud Development

The multi-tenant development-Platform-as-a-Service (dPaaS) is now unrestricted even though it’s free

CollabNet, the enterprise cloud development concern, figures the new version of CloudForge it's put together kicks butt, leapfrogging GitHub and BitBucket by offering the broadest, freest toolkit around, while romancing developers by taking the shackles off its use.

The multi-tenant development-Platform-as-a-Service (dPaaS) is now unrestricted even though it's free. It can build web sites, mobile, cloud and web applications, and rapidly prototype and deploy business software.

CloudForge can now be used by an unlimited number of users for an unlimited number of private projects, and it comes with Subversion and Git, the version control fixtures, so these users won't get lost in their own underwear. If you've got something better, bring it along.

It also comes with a free instance of TeamForge, the enterprise-class Agile/DevOps platform that used to be reserved for developers who worked for check-writing companies.

TeamForge can now be used to synchronize teams of just a few people to thousands of developers and projects, and includes Agile planning, bug-and-issue tracking, and collaboration wikis.

Besides TeamForge, the widgetry is integrated with Box to power content collaboration and document management across any organization and accelerate the development process.

Thanks to the new relationship, users can access and share their content stored on Box alongside their development assets.

It also comes with 20GB of free storage, double what GitHub or BitBucket offer.

CollabNet says it took the restrictions off so "developers and teams can get started instantly, realize value immediately, and securely scale based on their growing and maturing needs." What it means is it's out looking for new adherents. It says it's got 27,000 users, 4,000 of them paying customers.

"Just like Agile and DevOps adoption, cloud-based software development is moving from small grassroots projects to larger initiatives and adoption in the enterprise," said Nick Bell, senior director of CollabNet Cloud Services. "With the new CloudForge we remove the restrictive approach other cloud platforms impose on developers and, with the addition of TeamForge, help connect small teams and larger organizations in a very collaborative and enterprise-friendly approach."

CollabNet figures other, so-called "enterprise-grade" cloud development schemes fall short in terms of scalability, visibility, management and strategic value, a pretty damning indictment.

It also reckons it's unrestricted "most complete Free" scheme is disruptive and should obviously spur adoption. It also provides a growth path.

Besides the free version, there's a $2-a-month-a-user standard plan for up to five users and non-critical projects that's set up for customized TeamForge projects, a single deployment target, basic user roles, e-mail-only support, and on-demand backups with Trac and Bugzilla and more than 20 gigs of storage.

Then there's the $10-a-month-per-user professional plan for SMBs and enterprise workgroups that comes in five-user packs like the standard plan and offers advanced user roles and permissions, multiple deployment targets, priority support, an SLA, custom backups, API access in a multi-tenant environment with high availability and still more storage.

Last, there's the single-tenant enterprise plan for multiple workgroups. It starts at 25 users and is custom, down to the pricing. It involves a community architecture, cross-project search and enterprise reporting.

CollabNet pioneered the adoption of open source tools in large enterprises through its Subversion roots - it claims a level of cloud-based collaborative development experience as well as infrastructure knowledge that is unmatched in the industry. It's currently lowering the barriers to adoption for cloud services and adding value at the base level.

You might want to look at its five-step blueprint, called Enterprise Cloud Development (www.collab.net/solutions), for guiding organizations as they adopt hybrid cloud strategies into the software delivery lifecycle.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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